Success with Spaghetti Squash

Every now and then a customer would request spaghetti squash but since it wasn’t a common vegetable we never thought to grow it. After an increasing number of requests we decided to set aside a test area to try and grow it along side the butternut and acorn squash.

We couldn’t be happier with the results. With only a few plants we grew almost 30 squash and some of them were incredibly large! Every customer that requested this squash bought one to try and the feedback was amazing. “The best spaghetti squash I’ve ever had in my life!” was becoming a common comment on deliver day. With my limited experience eating this squash I actually had to agree with them! Even the man of the house who is not a fan of any kind of squash fell in love with it.

If you are not familiar with spaghetti squash it looks like a yellow football and about the size of one too. Like other fall/winter squash you cut it down the center, scoop out the seeds and baked it in the oven until it is tender. The difference with this squash is you take a fork, pull it down through the tender meat and it comes out in strips like a thick spaghetti noodle.

I recommend everyone grow this because it is so easy to grow with a big return.

Growing Luffa

Do you know what a Luffa is? Sometimes it’s spelled Loofah. It’s a natural sponge that historically was used to clean dishes and today it is used on the body in the shower to smooth your skin.

Luffa are actually a squash/gourd. They grow like a zucchini but are heavy on fiber that when dried result in the sponges you see in the store. Why are we growing luffa? It’s something to add to our mix that has a long shelf life so is readily available. It’s also organic and bio-degradable so chemical free and good for the environment. We are hoping to find a market for it.

How easy is it to grow? It’s fairly easy, however we made the mistake of planting it next to broccoli which grew very tall this year. There was too much shade. We only ended up with 3 fully grown luffa at the end of the season and only 1 that had enough fiber to dry into a sponge. We found out after the fact that luffa required over 250 sunny days to grow well and we live in a short season environment.

We will try again next year and start growing inside to get a jump start to meet the 250 days.